The End of the American Century
1989 by Steven Schlossstein
537 pages, Contemporary Books
(Source notes, Bibliography, Index)
ISBN 0-8092-0201-0Z
ISBN 0-86553-201-0 (International)


"Schlossstein tells us why The End of the American Century doesn't have to mean the end of the American dream — providing we understand what it will take to compete in a world we no longer dominate.
     - Lee Iacocca, former chairman and CEO, Chrysler Corporation

"A broad-gauged, well-informed, and highly readable book that wrestles with the big issues under competitive pressure: education, company vitality, and national policy.
     - Ezra Vogel, director, East Asian Studies Department,
       Harvard University

"Provides fascinating insights into the strengths and weaknesses of education in Japan and the Unitd States, and underscores the crucial connection between our schools and America's future.
     - Fred Hechinger, former education editor, The New York Times

"This is a massively important book... more thoughtful than anything I've read about America and Japan.
     - Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, author of
       The American Challenge

"A ringing call to arms for all Americans... a course of action to make our country stronger and more competitive in the 21st century.
     - David Kearns, former chairman and CEO, Xerox Corporation

"Don't be fooled by the title. Schlossstein makes an impressive statement about America's opportunity to reemerge as a stronger and more competitive nation.
     - Jerry Junkins, former chairman and CEO, Texas Instruments

"A book that everyone — in public life or not — should read to understand the challenges our nation faces in global competition. Extremely timely and thought-provoking.
     - Thomas H. Kean, former governor of New Jersey

"As pride killed the heroes in so many Greek tragedies, America must be careful not to let its own pride do it in, for a dead hero cannot rise again.
     - Dr. Bernhard Plettner, former chairman, Siemens AG, Munich

"Well documented, highly readable, and controversial — a monumental work.
     - Noburo Makino, former chairman, Mitsubishi Research Institute, Tokyo